Subject

Articles

Synchronizing Concurrent Operations in C++

By Anthony Williams

This article explores how to synchronize concurrent operations in the C++ programming language and how this relates to threads and their respective function.

Strategies for Decomposing an Application into Services

By Chris Richardson

In this article, you will learn about various strategies for breaking up applications into their component services, and the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

The Foundations of Functional Concurrency

By Riccardo Terrell

In this article, we discuss the need for concurrency, common issues specific to developing concurrent applications in either imperative or object-oriented programming (OOP) and functional programming, and why the functional programming paradigm is ideal for solving common concurrency issues.

Handling Client Requests Properly with Kubernetes

By Marko Lukša

It goes without saying that we want client requests to be handled properly. We obviously don’t want to see broken connections when pods are starting up or shutting down. By itself, Kubernetes doesn’t ensure this never happens. Your app needs to follow a few rules to prevent broken connections. This article discusses those rules.

GCP Data Center Locations: location is important, even in the Cloud

By J.J. Geewax

This article explores Google Cloud Platform data center locations and how to choose which data center (and cloud service provider) is right for you and your customers in terms of geographic location.

Routing strategies within Akka.Net

By Anthony Brown

Akka.Net provides several implementations of the core routing logic to allow for a variety of techniques for distributing messages through the router to its routees. These routers allow for a wide variety of behaviours which ultimately allow us to continue to build applications that remain responsive even under intense load. In this article, we’ll look at the routers included with Akka.Net and the advantages they provide.

Messages in Microservices

By Richard Rodger

The term microservices invites you to think in terms of services. You are naturally drawn to ask the question, What are the microservices in this system? Resist that temptation. Microservice systems are powerful because they allow you to think in terms of messages. If you take a messages-first approach to your system design, you free yourself from premature implementation decisions. The intended behavior of the system can be described in terms of a language of messages, independent of the underlying microservices that generate and react to those messages.

Make Apps that Interact with Multiple Senses

By Matt Lacey

In this article, you will learn about designing apps that don’t rely on single sense interaction, but instead take advantage of multiple senses to provide a better user experience.

Java Microservices and JeAS

By Ken Finnigan

Just enough Application Server (JeAS) is a term has been used on occasion over the years, but usually in relation to customizing a full application server by removing functionality manually. Only with the popularity of microservices has JeAS become crucial for Enterprise Java. This article talks about what JeAS means and some of its benefits.

Explaining Subscriptions in RxJava

By Timo Tuominen

In this article we’ll take a quick look at subscriptions in RxJava programming. To see how subscriptions work we’ll take a real-life example of a newspaper subscription.

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