Subject

Development

Building practical blockchain apps

From Programming Hyperledger Fabric by Siddharth Jain

The guide to EF Core

From Entity Framework Core in Action, Second Edition by Jon P Smith

Writing and Managing Application Logs with Docker

From Learn Docker in a Month of Lunches by Elton Stoneman

Logging is usually the most boring part of learning a new technology, but it’s not the case with Docker. The basic principle is simple: you need to make sure your application logs are written to the standard output stream, because this is where Docker looks for them. This can be achieved in a couple of ways, which we’ll cover in this article, and then the fun begins.

Introducing the OpenAPI Specification

From Designing APIs with Swagger and OpenAPI by Josh Poenlat

This article covers:

  Informal vs Formal descriptions

  Learning about the OpenAPI specification

  Learning about YAML ( as a easier-to-write JSON )

  Describing our first GET operation

Organize your logs

From Unified Logging with Fluentd by Phil Wilkins

Capability-Based Security and Macaroons

From API Security in Action by Neil Madden

In this article, you’ll implement capability-based access control techniques that enable secure sharing by taking the principle of least authority (POLA) to its logical conclusion and allowing fine-grained control over access to individual resources. Along the way, you’ll see how capabilities prevent a general category of attacks against APIs known as confused deputy attacks.

Getting to Know Knative

From Knative in Action by Jacques Chester

This article introduces Knative and explores its function(s) and best use.

Exploring the useEffect API with Easy Examples

From React Hooks in Action by John Larsen

Some of our React components are super-friendly, reaching out to say “hi” to APIs and services outside of React. Although they’re eternally optimistic and like to think the best of all those they meet, there are some safeguards to be followed. In this article, we’ll look at setting up side effects in ways that won’t get out of hand. In particular, we’ll explore these four scenarios:

§ Running side effects after every render

§ Running an effect only when a component mounts

§ Cleaning up side effects by returning a function

§ Controlling when an effect runs by specifying dependencies

To focus on the API we’ll create some easy component examples. First up, let’s say “Bonjour, les side-effects.”

Automated JavaScript testing

From Testing JavaScript Applications by Lucas da Costa

AWS Automation with AWS CloudFormation

From AWS CloudFormation in Action by Chuck Gehman

© 2020 Manning — Design Credits