Subject

Operations & Cloud

Mountebank and Continuous Delivery

From Testing Microservices with Mountebank by Brandon Byars

This article includes A basic refresher on continuous delivery, test strategy for continuous delivery and microservices, and where service virtualization applies within a broader testing strategy.

The API Gateway Pattern

From Microservices Patterns by Chris Richardson

In this article, I describe the API gateway pattern. I discuss its benefits and drawbacks. I also describe various design issues that you must address when developing an API gateway.

Join the Container Revolution Today!

From Docker in Action, Second Edition

slideshare-join-the-container-revolution-today

How OpenShift’s Core Components Work

From OpenShift in Action
OpenShift2
By Jamie Duncan, John Osborne

Sharing Data Volumes Between Machines: EFS

From Amazon Web Services in Action, Second Edition by Michael Wittig and Andreas Wittig

In this article, we will compare various vile systems and how you can share data across EC2 instances.

Leverage Machine Learning on AWS


slideshare-leverage-machine-learning-on-aws

By Kesha Williams

Domain Primitives: what they are and how you can use them to make more secure software

From Secure By Design by Dan Bergh Johnsson, Daniel Deogun, Daniel Sawano

This article delves into domain primitives: what they are, how to define them, and how they can be used to create secure software.

Securing Spring

From Spring in Action, Fifth Edition by Craig Walls

Security is essential to development, and it’s better to treat it as a concern rather than as a feature or add-on. This article, taken from chapter 4 of Spring in Action, Fifth Edition, discusses securing Spring.

Aunt Maria’s Serverless Pizzeria

From Serverless Applications with Node js by Slobodan Stojanović and Aleksandar Simović

This article, excerpted from Serverless Apps with Node and Claudia.js, explores building a back-end app and API to process and store orders for aunt Maria’s pizzeria.

What do Servers have in common with Washing Machines?

From Serverless Applications with Node.js by Slobodan Stojanović and Aleksandar Simović

To understand serverless, consider for a moment washing machines. This might sound like a crazy place to start, but owning a server nowadays is similar to owning a washing machine. Everybody needs to clean their clothes, and the most logical solution seems to be buying a washing machine. But most of the time the washing machine is plugged in, it’s doing nothing. At best, it’s used five to fifteen hours per week. Same goes with servers. Most of the time, your average application server is waiting to receive a request, doing nothing.

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